Learning to play an instrument

All of the stages that come with learning to play an instrument – Daily Californian

Summary

Throughout my life, I’ve learned multiple instruments ranging from string and wind instruments such as violin and flute to percussion instruments such as piano and drums. Even though the mechanisms of each specific instrument are extremely different, the learning process was more or less the same. Here are the four stages I have experienced in all of my years of playing!

Stage 1: Making sounds

The difficult but necessary step, learning to make a sound on your instrument is us…….

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Throughout my life, I’ve learned multiple instruments ranging from string and wind instruments such as violin and flute to percussion instruments such as piano and drums. Even though the mechanisms of each specific instrument are extremely different, the learning process was more or less the same. Here are the four stages I have experienced in all of my years of playing!

Stage 1: Making sounds

The difficult but necessary step, learning to make a sound on your instrument is usually the most frustrating period for any beginner regardless of the instrument (well, maybe not piano). When I learned how to play the flute, this was made up of making windy wooshes while attempting to make any sound, and the violin equivalent was making chicken screaming screeches while trying to angle my bow correctly. But don’t worry! This period will certainly pass, and while you may not know exactly how to play yet, you’ll at least be able to produce a sound with the instrument!

Stage 2: Diligent practice 

Once you’re able to start making sounds on the instrument, you then start searching up YouTube tutorial videos while spending all of your free time practicing. This stage is usually the time period where you’re able to improve the fastest.

Stage 3: Resisting practice

At a certain time, you get so burnt out that you start resisting practicing as it now feels like a chore. You stop improving overall, and you start questioning your capabilities. This stage often involves doubting yourself and asking, “Is this the instrument for me?” or, “Should I quit?” This stage can vary anywhere from a month to years and is definitely the most dreaded period during one’s journey when learning a new instrument.

Stage 4: Loving to play

After the excruciating time frame of resisting practice and stopping to play completely, there is usually a time that you pick up the instrument due to curiosity. You then start to enjoy playing again, and it stops feeling like a chore. In my personal experience, this happens when you aren’t forced to practice in music class or by your parents and can truly play for just yourself.

So there you have it! If you’re an experienced player, these might sound familiar to you. If you’re just getting started, be prepared to go through these stages!

Contact Erica Jean at [email protected].

Source: https://www.dailycal.org/2021/07/09/stages-of-learning-to-play-an-instrument/